“The Ultimate SciStarter How-To” (recorded webinar from the Citizen Science Association)

By Darlene Cavalier December 11th, 2017 at 4:51 pm | Comment

SciStarter (see SciStarter.com) helps people discover opportunities to engage in scientific research through a searchable database of more than 2200 projects and events shared with PBS, Discover, the National Science Teachers Association, libraries, museums, and more. Participants can find, bookmark, join, and track their contributions to projects through SciStarter. Project leaders can register their projects/events/tools on SciStarter and tap into free promotional and recruiting services while learning more about the interests and behaviors of their participants. Researchers can access dynamic data about the landscape of projects (topics, audiences, and goals, for example), or work with SciStarter to dive deeper into analytics.

If you are a project leader, this webinar will help you learn how to:
1) easily add your project, event, or tool and, 2) integrate new, NSF-supported embeddable tools to recruit, retain, and learn more about the behaviors of participants.

If you are a researcher, this webinar will help you learn how to:
1) quickly access dynamic data about projects (% with classroom materials; % of online projects, and more), and 2) work with SciStarter to access deeper analytics.

If you represent a STEM resource provider, University, or K-12 institution, this webinar will help you learn how to:
1) embed a plug-in version of the SciStarter database on your own website; 2) pilot our subscription-based, curated, facilitated citizen science experience.

Stay warm with winter projects from home!

By Sarah Newman December 9th, 2017 at 4:06 pm | Comment

This week we are highlighting projects that help advance research on penguins, seals, the Antarctica and more.

Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

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Saving Sea Turtles Through Community Litter Cleanups

By Guest December 6th, 2017 at 8:20 pm | Comment

By: Christi Hughes

In January 2016, a young sea turtle named Grace was found floating cold and listless next to a dock in Awendaw, South Carolina. She was rescued by compassionate locals to the South Carolina Aquarium Sea Turtle Care Center™ for life-saving medical treatment. Grace, who was the size of a dinner plate, ultimately required exploratory surgery to remove a piece of flexible plastic about the size of a silver dollar­– very likely from a single-use plastic grocery bag – from her intestinal tract. Luckily, Grace made a full recovery and was released back into the ocean in July 2016. Read the rest of this entry »

Help Cure Plant Blindness through Citizen Science! Participate in TreeVersity at the Arnold Arboretum

By Guest December 2nd, 2017 at 11:16 am | Comment

The Arboretum’s Living Collection contains over 15,000 plants representing some 4,000 kinds of trees, shrubs, and vines, including the Franklin Tree (Franklinia alatamaha), extinct in the wild for over 200 years. (Photo by Danny Schissler, ©2017 President and Fellows of Harvard College)

By Jon Hetman (Associate Director of External Relations and Communications) and Danny Schissler (Research Assistant, Friedman Lab)

Boston, MA- If a picture is worth a thousand words, then the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University is sharing more details than ever before about its 15,000 collected plants. The best part—you can help make it happen! In October, the Arboretum launched TreeVersity, a citizen science project designed to collect information on some 25,000 images of the trees, shrubs, and vines growing across its Olmsted-designed landscape.

Since its founding in 1872, Arboretum staff have used photography to help document the plants the institution collects, grows, and preserves for scientific study and horticultural display. Thousands of historical images—captured by famed explorers like Ernest Henry Wilson, Joseph Rock, and Frank Meyer—have long been available for viewing and downloading through the online Image Archive of the Harvard University Libraries. Read the rest of this entry »

Exploring the wonder of birds through the Migratory Shorebird Project

By Kristin Butler November 28th, 2017 at 2:18 pm | Comment

I used to think of birds as delicate creatures, airy and carefree, with pretty feathers and pretty songs. Then I saw the film “Winged Migration” and came to understand just how gritty and daring these lovely creatures really are.

The film uses bird’s-eye footage to document the treacherous treks birds across the globe make each year—over the Himalayas, across oceans, into raging storms, and through hunters’ lines-of-fire, and anyone who sees it can’t help but respect the animals and wonder more about birds’ adventuresome lives.  Read the rest of this entry »