SciStarter adds first Canadian organization as a citizen science partner

By January 28th, 2016 at 9:20 am | Comment

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SciStarter adds first Canadian organization as a citizen science partner

The David Suzuki Foundation expands citizen science projects to include Canadians

Philadelphia, PA / Vancouver, B.C. (January 28, 2016) — The David Suzuki Foundation is teaming up with SciStarter to encourage science researchers in Canada to engage more citizen science partners through SciStarter’s North America-wide database and international reach.

“Global collaboration on scientific research on the environment is crucial,” said Darlene Cavalier, founder of SciStarter and professor of practice at Arizona State University. “We’re thrilled to see growing involvement from the international scientific community, particularly from the David Suzuki Foundation, which works to conserve the environment and find solutions to some of Canada’s most pressing environmental concerns.”

“SciStarter will help us promote the concept of citizen science in Canada,” said Scott Wallace, senior research scientist at the David Suzuki Foundation. “This hub of international science activity will make it easier to engage volunteers, track new projects and strengthen the value of citizen science with broader audiences.” The Foundation’s work includes a focus on ocean health, climate and energy, environmental rights and getting children into nature, all of which benefit from greater public engagement in science.

IMG_0970A citizen science project can involve one person or millions of people collaborating for a common goal. SciStarter’s website connects scientists and community leaders to more than 1,100 citizen science projects and anyone wishing to contribute to science research.

 

What scientists and citizen scientists need to know

Scientists from around the world can add their research to SciStarter’s Project Finder to be accessed by a network of project supporters and participants. Members can update projects in the same location.

Citizen scientists can identify research projects they’d like to participate in by searching the Project Finder based on type of activity, scientific topic, location and more. The website will soon include GIS functions to make it easier to find projects in a local community.

SciStarter programs are already shared in the U.S. with Serve.gov, a clearinghouse of national volunteer opportunities managed by the Corporation for National and Community Service and internationally through the United Nations Environment Programme’s citizen science portal. UNEP considers SciStarter a valuable resource for sharing knowledge around the world to promote innovation and encourage scientific enquiry about the environment and other topics.

 

About SciStarter

SciStarter aims to enable people to contribute to science through informal recreational activities and formal research efforts. The website creates a shared space where scientists can connect with people interested in working on or learning about joint research projects. SciStarter features 1,100 searchable citizen science projects and recruits participants through partnerships with Discover Magazine and Astronomy Magazine, PBS Kids, the National Science Teachers Association, Public Library of Science, WHYY/NPR, Pop Warner Youth Scholars, and more.

 

About the David Suzuki Foundation

The David Suzuki Foundation collaborates with Canadians from all walks of life, including government and business, to conserve our environment and find solutions that will create a sustainable Canada through science-based research, education and policy work. Its mission is to protect the diversity of nature and our quality of life, now and for the future. Its vision is that, within a generation, Canadians will act on the understanding that we are all interconnected and interdependent with nature.

Categories: Citizen Science

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