Archive for the ‘Animals’ Category

An Autumn Bounty of Citizen Science

By October 14th, 2017 at 4:10 am | Comment

Season Spotter

Birds and monarchs are migrating and leaves are changing color. Fall is in full swing! Unfortunately, hurricanes are forming and flu season is here too.

Help scientists document nature and health changes near you to study and predict future trends.
 
Our editors selected five projects to get you started. Find more citizen science projects on SciStarter’s Project Finder.    
 
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team
Read the rest of this entry »

Sit, Shake, Citizen Science!

By August 24th, 2017 at 4:00 pm | Comment

U.S. Air Force Photo/Senior Airman Christopher Griffin

 

If you have a cat or dog at home, chances are they love spending time with you. Now you have one more way to show them your love – with citizen science, just in time for National Dog Day on August 26! Below, we highlight projects you can do at home with your four-legged friends. Try them out and let us know what you think! Find more projects and events on SciStarter, to do now or bookmark for later.
 
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

C-BARQ

C-BARQ_ Pixabay

You know your dog better than anyone. Help researchers at the University of Pennsylvania standardize how canine temperament and behavior are evaluated. Fill out a short survey about the way your dog behaves.

There’s also a survey for cats called Fe-BARQ.

Location: Global, online

Family Dog Project/Barkingvizsla

Family Dog Project

You can be a part of the largest dog research group in the world when you participate in the Family Dog Project.

Listen to dog and human sounds to determine emotions and help researchers better understand relationships between dogs and humans.

Location: Global, online

Canine Health Project

pxhere.com
Do you have a purebred dog? The Canine Health Project tracks individual statistics on purebred dogs such as height, weight, date of birth, genotype, and more.

Add your dog’s stats today!

Location: Global, online

Pets Can Do

Rhys Asplundh CC BY 2.0

Researchers at the University of Lincoln, England, are trying to better understand animal behavior, including how much animals understand, known as cognition.

Fill out a survey about your dog or cat to contribute to their research!

 
Location: Global, online

Cat Tracker

Cat Tracker Diet Study Collection
Cats have built a reputation on their mysteriousness. But you can learn more about the secret life of your cat with Cat
Tracker.Learn where your outdoor cat hangs out and what they eat (beyond the bowl) or study your cat’s personality with a quick survey!
 
Location: Global

Discover more summertime citizen science on the SciStarter calendar. Did you know your SciStarter dashboard helps you track your contributions to projects? Complete your profile to access free tools. Want even more citizen science? Check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

Shark Week: A feeding frenzy for citizen scientists!

By July 21st, 2017 at 12:22 pm | Comment

Sink your teeth into these projects!

Photo: Shark Count

The Discovery Channel kicks off Shark Week in three days, when we’ll will find out if Michael Phelps is faster than a shark! Not quite up for racing a shark yourself? You can still celebrate Shark Week by getting involved in one of the many citizen science projects that study and protect sharks. Below, we’ve highlighted five projects we think you’ll love. In some cases, you can even participate from the comfort of home. Find more projects and events on SciStarter, to do now or bookmark for later. Remember to update your profile before August 15th to unlock access to a special prize!

Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

eShark
eShark
Calling all divers and snorkelers! You have valuable information to share because you can census areas that fishers can’t. Help track how shark and ray populations have changed.
Location: Global

SharkBase
SharkBase
Even if you’ve never seen a shark in the wild, you can still contribute to SharkBase by submitting sightings that you see in the news or on the internet. Your observations will help track sharks’ global population changes.
Location: Global. Online.

New England Basking Shark and Ocean Sunfish Project
Help monitor basking shark and ocean sunfish in New England waters by sending in your photos from the seas!
Location: New England, USA

Credit_ Kelli Shaw
Sevengill Shark Identification 
Scuba divers are needed to help monitor sevengill sharks as they return each year to San Diego, CA and South Africa. Share your photos which will be analyzed online, using a pattern recognition system.
Location: San Diego, CA; South Africa 

ELMO South African Elasmobranch Monitoring
Collect data on South African sharks, skates, rays and chimaera sightings as well as their eggcases along the South African coastline. Whether you are a snorkeler, diver, swimmer, skipper, angler or a beachwalker, you can assist by reporting your sighting or reports you’ve seen in the news.
Location: Mozambique Republic, South Africa

Discover more summertime citizen on the SciStarter Calendar. Needed: 1,000 skilled photographers to help create the Eclipse MegaMovie on August 21Want more citizen science? Check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

Wildlife Disease Citizen Science

By February 2nd, 2017 at 2:04 pm | Comment

Photo: USFWS

Photo: USFWS

Wild animals get sick from parasites, fungi, and other causes just like people and pets do, but they don’t usually have doctors to help them get better. Instead, you can help them with citizen science! Below, we highlight five projects that study wildlife diseases. Find more projects on SciStarter to do now, or bookmark your favorites for later!

Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

Photo: USGS
ZomBee Watch
Honey bees across North America are being infected by tiny parasites called Zombie Flies; the sick bees abandon their hives and die. Volunteers can capture honey bees and test them for the presence of the parasite.

Photo: Bethann Merkle
Bee Germs
Many bee species nest in the ground, and often we know very little about the diseases that impact them. If you have ground-nesting bees in your area, you can collect a few and send them to researchers to be tested for diseases.

Photo: NPS
Project Monarch Health
A parasite called OE affects monarchs throughout the United States; the disease causes malformations and even death. Volunteers can help track the abundance of this disease by capturing monarchs, painlessly collecting a sample of their scales, and then releasing them.

Photo: SERC
Chesapeake Bay Parasite Project
If you live in the Chesapeake Bay area, you can help survey for an invasive parasite that is infecting native mud crabs. Volunteers are needed for this summer, so use our new bookmark feature to save the project for later!

Photo: USFWS
OK Amphibian Disease Testing
Students and teachers in Oklahoma are needed to catch frogs, swab them for a fungus called chytrid (potentially lethal to frogs), and then safely release them. Request a monitoring kit now to be prepared for the March-June peak monitoring season.


Want more citizen science? Check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

How to Tell a Rock from a Penguin: It’s Harder Than It Sounds

By January 26th, 2017 at 4:22 pm | Comment

Adelie penguins. Credit: Jean Pennycook

By: Lishka Arata

Many things distinguish penguins from rocks. There’s color difference (usually), behavior (penguins waddle, rocks don’t), social structure (rocks don’t have one) — the list goes on. But why might someone need to distinguish between rocks and penguins?

It’s a skill central to a long-term project that relies on citizen scientists, working from the comfort of their homes, to identify penguins in photographs taken by remotely operated cameras in Antarctica. The project, focused on Adelie penguins, aims to determine how climate change affects living systems. Read the rest of this entry »