Archive for the ‘Astronomy & Space’ Category

SciStarter’s Top 10 Projects of 2017 are here!

By January 15th, 2018 at 2:02 pm | Comment

 

What a year it has been! We now have more than 50,000 active members participating in over 1,700 projects on SciStarter. We can’t wait to see what 2018 brings.

From neurons to whales and everything in between, the 2017 Top 10 Projects are as varied and diverse as their participants. Thanks for making it such a successful year for citizen science.

This list, in no particular order, is based on the 10 projects with the most page views on SciStarter *and* the most “joins”.

Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

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Time to Shift our Gaze Skyward

By December 21st, 2017 at 3:26 pm | Comment

I noticed the season’s first juncos hopping in my yard a few short weeks ago – an event I look forward to every year because I know their arrival here in New England means winter is on its way. And by “winter,” I mean, specifically, winter solstice – the longest night of the year, the end of six months during which the sun sets earlier and earlier every day. Like people of many cultures around the world, I celebrate the first day of winter because it marks the time when we reclaim our daylight, minute by minute, as we march towards warmer days of spring. Read the rest of this entry »

Spooktacular Citizen Science

By October 28th, 2017 at 4:07 pm | Comment

Shaker Village

Treat yourself with citizen science this Halloween. Take a stroll through a pumpkin patch to look for insects or spend a night under the stars watching bats. Staying indoors? Map craters on the moon for NASA!

Grab a few sweets from the candy dish and scroll through our editor’s picks below. You’re sure to find a project to enjoy. And that’s no trick!
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team
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Mission: Starlight Uses Space to Spark Curiosity in Chemistry

By September 26th, 2017 at 3:11 pm | Comment

How can you protect an astronaut from getting a sunburn in space?

Kids learn how chemistry can protect astronauts at England’s National Space Center in Leicester. Credit: National Space Centre, Leicester 2

The Royal Society of Chemistry in London has designed a collection of hands-on chemistry experiments that kids can do to explore this question and discover the answer for themselves.

The project is called Mission: Starlight. It is free and includes downloadable videos, worksheets, and instructions on how to teach four different hands-on, hour-long lessons and experiments designed for elementary and secondary school students. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sky is Falling! Or is It?

By August 29th, 2017 at 7:04 pm | Comment

By Dolores Hill and Carl Hergenrother, Target Asteroids! Co-Leads Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission

Today’s amateur astronomers carry on long held traditions in citizen science by making valuable contributions in data collection and monitoring celestial objects of all kinds. They supplement work done by professional astronomers and fill gaps in our knowledge. Imagine being a modern-day Tycho Brahe who, in the late-1500s, measured positions of stars that were so accurate and reliable that Johannes Kepler used them to determine that the planets revolve around the sun in elliptical orbits! Imagine contributing to an asteroid data repository and assisting future space travelers; both robotic and human. Read the rest of this entry »