Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Third annual Citizen Science Day celebrates discovery, innovation, and better understanding of our world through public participation in science.

By November 14th, 2017 at 6:49 pm | Comment

SciStarter, the Citizen Science Association, and the Citizen Science Day Working Group are excited to present Citizen Science Day on Saturday April 14th, 2018! The third annual Citizen Science Day celebrates the work of citizen scientists and the diversity of citizen science projects across the world, encourages the public to get involved, and connects people to the power of citizen science.

Many may not realize the powerful contributions that citizen science makes to scientific discovery, monitoring, and innovation – and many may not know that they can be a part of those efforts. Citizen Science Day is a chance see how we can all make a difference by sharing what we see and what we know – whether that is mapping for disaster relief, helping find cures for diseases, or ensuring our streams are clean,” says Jennifer Shirk Director of the Citizen Science Association.

Organizations from museums, aquariums, nature centers, government agencies, universities, parks departments, and more have participated in the 2016 and 2017 Citizen Science Day. See the 2017 and 2016 events archived online.

Your organization can celebrate citizen science in many ways:

  1. Host a program on or around April 14th to increase awareness of citizen science and/or to let people participate in citizen science. Past examples include transcription challenges, citizen science hikes, BioBlitzes, hack-a-thons, festivals, science marches, and more.
  2. Outreach for your citizen science projects and recruit volunteers with an open house or training events.
  3. Highlight your standout citizen scientists from the year by recognizing their contributions.
  4. Promote citizen science through your social media platforms to help bring awareness about the breadth and depth of projects and the many ways to become a citizen scientist
  5. Launch that citizen science project you’ve been waiting to get started.
  6. Convene a regional meeting of citizen science practitioners, scientists, land managers, and local government to exchange ideas and create broader impacts for citizen science in your area.
  7. Or come up with your own way to celebrate the day!

Also be sure to check in with the Citizen Science Day webpage on the Citizen Science Association site for more ideas, resources, and other helpful tips for celebrating and promoting citizen science on April 14!

Once you plan your event, add it to the SciStarter Citizen Science Day Calendar so people can find it! SciStarter will share events through  syndicated partners including Discover Magazine, Astronomy Magazine, PBS, PLoS, National Science Teacher’s Association, Philly.com, Girl Scouts, and more!

“Adding a Citizen Science Day event or project to SciStarter benefits three audiences,” said Darlene Cavalier, Founder of SciStarter. “Event organizers can easily promote events and recruit participants; the public can find and join events and projects; and researchers can analyze data about the projects and events and study the movement and outcomes of people engaged these events.”

We are excited to celebrate citizen science with you on April 14!


For more information about Citizen Science Day, contact the task force:

Lila Higgins (lhiggins@nhm.org)

Catherine Hoffman (catherine@scistarter.com)

Alison Young (ayoung@calacademy.org)

Interested in supporting Citizen Science Day? We’re actively looking for funders and sponsors. Contact us for more information.

(What’s your citizen science profile? Create yours today! )

Citizen Science and The Age of Disruption: Navigating, Innovating, and Excelling. Nov 12–14 Washington, DC

By November 8th, 2017 at 5:57 pm | Comment

Planning to attend the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities annual meeting? SciStarter’s founder, Darlene Cavalier will be there to speak about “Citizen science and crowd-sourcing among other options for universities to move forward and find new ways to collectively address societal challenges.”

11/12 1:45–3:00 p.m. Delaware Suite
The Knowledge Paradox: How Can Expertise Be Dead Amidst Ubiquitous Information?

The disparagement of expertise at a time of ubiquity of information is forcing universities and scholars to redefine their role as experts. Universities must engage more deeply and differently with society to co-create and diffuse knowledge. Citizen science and crowd-sourcing are among options for
universities to move forward and find new ways to collectively address societal challenges. Attendees will interact with panelists through both questions and electronic comments posted on a screen alongside the podium.

MODERATOR: Rush Holt , CEO, AAAS – The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

PANELISTS: Darlene Cavalier, Founder, SciStarter Professor, Arizona State University Center for Engagement and Training School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU

Dietram Scheufele, John E. Ross Professor in Science
Communication and Vilas Distinguished Achievement
Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison

http://www.aplu.org/meetings-and-events/annual-meeting/aplu-annual-meeting-2017-final-program.pdf

 

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Why “SciStarter is excellent for citizen science.”

By July 12th, 2017 at 9:00 am | Comment

Well thank you for the kind words, Pietro Michelucci (founder of EyesOnALZ, a crowdsourcing platform designed to accelerate Alzheimer’s research). Pietro is one of 15 project and platform partners we’ve been working with to test and deploy a suite of new citizen science tools.

For the past two years, thanks to support from the National Science Foundation, the SciStarter team has been hard at work building tools, partnerships, and methodologies to help connect millions of citizen scientists to thousands of projects in need of their help and, at the same time, break down barriers currently preventing participants from reaching their full potential.

SciStarter is a National Science Foundation-supported, project agnostic platform supporting recruitment and retention of volunteers into over 1,500 citizen science initiatives from hundreds of organizations. The platform also facilitates studies to improve our understanding of citizen science in partnership with Arizona State University, North Carolina State University, Colorado State University, Cornell and dozens of other collaborators, including the Federal Community of Practice for Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science.

Last week, Dr. Caren Cooper and I had the pleasure of unveiling “SciStarter 2.0” at an event in Washington, D.C.  Attendees were from the National Science Foundation, USGS, Department of Energy, Institute for Museum and Library Services, EPA, NPR, National Parks Service, Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes, and other organizations.

We described some trends, opportunities, and challenges in citizen science (particularly related to recruiting, training, equipping and retaining participants) from the eye-of-the-storm perspective of SciStarter.

This event included:

– a brief overview of citizen science;

– a presentation and soft-launch of SciStarter 2.0, a smart collection of web components, including a dashboard and integrated login, designed to extend, enhance, and enrich participant experiences while at the same time supporting STEM research and enabling research on motivations and learning outcomes of participants;

– and a discussion on future directions for SciStarter 3.0, given the opportunities and challenges facing participants, project organizers/researchers, and supporting agencies and foundations.

You can watch a recording of the presentation here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3or9U629wwE ) and view our slides by clicking on the image below or click here:SciStarter2.0_Federal-Agencies-Presentation.pptx-1 The slides provide details about the new tools we’ve deployed through a growing network of projects and platforms, as well as personal perspectives from the project owners using these tools (including quotes that made us blush, like the one from Pietro Michelucci).

We sincerely hope you enjoy the new SciStarter and we’d love to hear your ideas on how we can continue to empower people by providing better access to protocols, instruments, communities and ongoing support.  If you’re interested in working with SciStarter to advance your own research, we’d love to hear from you, too!  Please don’t hesitate to reach us at info@SciStarter.com .

Cheers!

SciStarter’s founder appointed to NAS committee on Citizen Science

By July 11th, 2017 at 12:04 am | Comment

Written by Adam Gabriele, Arizona State University. Originally published on ASUNow.

There’s an exciting change under way in the scientific community. Citizens with an avid interest in science are getting the chance to contribute to real research through data collection and analysis in collaboration with professional scientists.

Darlene Cavalier and Kiki Jenkins

Darlene Cavalier (left) and Kiki Jenkins

These “citizen scientists” — tinkerers and enthusiasts of all stripes — are being given the tools and platforms to turn their interests into real research, perhaps minimizing or even bringing to an end the stark division between academia and society.Darlene Cavalier and Kiki Jenkins, professors from the School for the Future of Innovation in Society.Download Full Image

In 2016, ASU hosted the Citizen Science Maker Summit, organized by Darlene Cavalier, professor of practice with ASU’s School for the Future of Innovation in Society (SFIS).

Diving in and developing creative solutions is a characteristic that “mirrors that of the millions of citizen scientists around the world who are contributing to our understanding of the world and how we can solve today’s problems,” Cavalier said.

ASU isn’t the only institution that’s caught on to the increasing relevance of citizen science.

The National Academy of Sciences has formed the Committee on Designing Citizen Science to Support Science Learning to identify and describe existing citizen science projects that support science learning in both formal and informal settings. The committee will develop a set of evidence-based principles to guide the design of citizen science.

Cavalier, founder of SciStarter — an online platform for identifying, supporting, and participating in citizen science opportunities, was invited to be a member of the committee.

“I’m thrilled to have an opportunity to work with the committee to address an important gap in citizen science literature:  understanding how to design citizen science so it can better support deeper forms of science learning,” she said.

The committee plans to evaluate the potential of citizen science to support science learning, lay out a research agenda to improve that potential, and identify promising practices and programs.

Cavalier is also the co-founder of the Expert and Citizen Assessment of Science and Technology (ECAST) network, co-editor of The Rightful Place of Science: Citizen Science, and a member of the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy and Technology.

Lekelia “Kiki” Jenkins, assistant professor at the School for the Future of Innovation in Society, has also been named a founding member of the committee.

Jenkins is an award-winning marine conservation scientist who has published extensively on adult science learning in fishery learning exchanges. She is a Ford Foundation Fellow, a David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellow, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.

“I’m honored to be selected to serve on the National Academies of Science Committee on Designing Citizen Science to Support Science Learning,” Jenkins said. “Serving on an NAS committee helps fulfil one of my career aspirations.”

Jenkins has already begun to implement a process for creating a consensus definition of citizen science, which, she said, “is a critical first step in the committee’s work.”

 

ASU and SciStarter host citizen science discussion on 6/20

By June 16th, 2017 at 9:34 am | Comment

On behalf of the Center for Engagement and Training in Science and Society, part of the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University, we invite you to attend an interactive presentation, “Citizen Science: an all hands-on-deck approach to advance scientific research.”
We will describe trends, opportunities, and challenges in citizen science (particularly related to recruiting, training, equipping and retaining participants) from the eye-of-the-storm perspective of SciStarter.
SciStarter is a National Science Foundation-supported, project agnostic platform supporting recruitment and retention of volunteers into over 1,000 citizen science initiatives from hundreds of organizations. The platform facilitates studies to improve our understanding of citizen science in partnership with Arizona State University, North Carolina State University, Colorado State University and dozens of other collaborators, including the Federal Community of Practice for Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science.
This event will include:
– a brief overview of citizen science;
– a presentation on SciStarter 2.0, a smart collection of web components, including a dashboard and integrated login, designed to extend, enhance, and enrich participant experiences while at the same time supporting STEM research and enabling research on motivations and learning outcomes of participants;
– and a discussion on future directions for SciStarter 3.0, given the opportunities and challenges facing participants, project organizers/researchers, and supporting agencies and foundations.
Please join us on Tuesday, June 20, 3:30-5pm at the beautiful District Architecture Center ( http://www.aiadc.com/dac ) which is Metro accessible via the Gallery Place/Chinatown Station and two blocks from Metro Center Station.
Meet our NSF program officer Bob Russell and others from federal agencies, think tanks, research institutions and organizations.
The event is free but seating is limited. Please RSVP to  Roxanne.Ladd@asu.edu by this Friday, 6/16.
The event will be shared via a webcast, recorded and posted here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3or9U629wwE .
Sincerely,
Darlene Cavalier (ASU/SciStarter), Ira Bennett (ASU), and Caren Cooper (NCSU/SciStarter)

Categories: Events