Archive for the ‘Newsletter’ Category

An Autumn Bounty of Citizen Science

By October 14th, 2017 at 4:10 am | Comment

Season Spotter

Birds and monarchs are migrating and leaves are changing color. Fall is in full swing! Unfortunately, hurricanes are forming and flu season is here too.

Help scientists document nature and health changes near you to study and predict future trends.
 
Our editors selected five projects to get you started. Find more citizen science projects on SciStarter’s Project Finder.    
 
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team
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What’s in your water?

By October 3rd, 2017 at 8:05 am | Comment

World Water Monitoring
World Water Monitoring
Our dependency on clean water is something we all have in common.
 
In celebration of the Clean Water Act’s 45th anniversary (October 18), we’ve selected six citizen science opportunities to monitor the vitality of water near you.
Find more citizen science projects on SciStarter’s Project Finder.
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

North Carolina King Tides Project

North Carolina King Tides Project
Grab your camera and document flood events throughout North Carolina. Your photos help communities understand vulnerabilities to coastal flooding and inform community planning.
 
Location: North Carolina, United States

Creek Freaks: Engaging Youth in Water Quality

IWLA
Middle school students around the globe are the experts on their local streams and creeks. Enlist your kids and monitor the quality of creeks and streams near you.
 
Location: Global

CitClops/Eye on Water

CitClops_EyeonWater
Monitoring the quality of the water in our oceans is a big job, especially when that water is constantly moving and changing. Using the Eye on Water app from the CitClops project, you can do your part by collecting information about water color, clarity and fluorescence of oceans around the world.
Location: Global

Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program

MICorps
  
Looking for a reason to get out on the lake? Michigan’s Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program is the second oldest lake monitoring program in the country.  Document changes in lake quality and share your observations with scientists.
 
Location: Michigan, US

Volunteer Stream Monitoring Program

MICorps
 
Live in Michigan? Help keep tabs on the streams in your community. MiCorps’ Volunteer Stream Monitoring Program (VSMP) provides technical assistance, training, and grants to volunteer stream monitors to ensure the collection of reliable, high-quality data.
 
Location: Michigan, US

FLOW Program

Amigos de Bolsas
Head to the beach with the Follow and Learn about the Ocean and Wetland (FLOW) program! You’ll learn about coastal ecology, participate in the collection of scientific data and get involved in environmental quality monitoring. You might also get a little sand in your shoes.
Location: Huntington Beach, CA

Discover more summertime citizen science on the SciStarter calendar. Did you know your SciStarter dashboard helps you track your contributions to projects? Complete your profile to access free tools. Want even more citizen science? Check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

Sweet Citizen Science for National Honey Month

By September 18th, 2017 at 2:33 pm | Comment

Johanna James-Heinz

“For bees the flower is the fountain of life. For flowers, the bee is the messenger of love.”

-Kahlil Gibran 
 
In honor of National Honey Month we’ve highlighted a few citizen science projects you can do to help us better understand our buzzing friends the bees. From honey bees to bumble bees, there’s something for everyone.   
 
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

Bumble Bee Watch

Rich Hatfield
Have you ever wondered what species of bumble bees live in your neighborhood? Start your own virtual bumble bee collection by sharing photos of bees and experts will help you identify them! You may be the person that locates a new population of a rare bumble bee species!
 
Location: North America

Bee Germs

Bethann Merkle
Many species of bees make their homes underground, right beneath our feet! But we don’t know a lot about these particular bees. By studying the germs (pathogens) underground dwelling bees carry, we can better understand how to help them.
 
Location: North America

Minnesota Bumble Bee Survey

Minnesota Bumble Bee Survey
Chasing bees through fields of flowers is a great way to spend a few hours. Several species of bumble bees appear to be declining but more information is needed to better understand where, when and why. Join a Minnesota Bumble Bee Survey to help figure out what’s happening with bumble bees.
 
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota, US

ZomBee Watch

USGS
Zombie flies are parasitizing bees in California and possibly other areas too! Capture honeybees and observe them over several days to look for Zombie fly pupae to emerge. 
 
Location: Global

EZ Water and Bees

Schanin – pixabay
What kind of water do bees prefer? What kind of water makes for the best honey production? By taking pictures of bees visiting water you can help answer these and other questions about bees, water, and honey.
Location: Global

BeeWise Honeybee and Nectar Pollen Map

Jane Crayton
Did you know that bees are out collecting pollen, even in the fall? Taking pictures of bees and the flowers they’re collecting nectar from or pollinating can help researchers better understand bee behavior. 
 
Location: Pueblo County, Colorado

Discover more summertime citizen science on the SciStarter calendar. Did you know your SciStarter dashboard helps you track your contributions to projects? Complete your profile to access free tools. Want even more citizen science? Check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

Citizen Science with your sun, sand, and surf?

By July 6th, 2017 at 1:47 pm | Comment

Citizen Science at the Beach
While you’re strolling along the beach this summer, consider sharing some of your keen observations with marine ecologists. Below, we’ve highlighted six beach-related citizen science projects to monitor the health of marine habitats. There is even one you can do while couch-surfing (see what we did there?). Find more projects and events on SciStarter, to do now or bookmark for later. 
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

JellyWatch
JellyWatch
Have you seen a jellyfish at your favorite beach yet? Jellywatch is a global public database documenting jellyfish but also red tides, squid and mammal strandings, and other indicators of ocean health. It’s simple to share your beach observations with this open database.
Location: Any coastal beach

E. Demers
British Columbia Beached Bird Survey
Surveying bird mortality is a helpful measure of marine ecology health. If you spot a dead bird along the beach, send in your observation to these researchers.
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Maui Coastal Marine Debris Monitoring
Maui Coastal Marine Debris Monitoring  
Help quantify and remove debris from Maui’s coastline. Contact project organizer Pacific Whale Foundation to get supplies before heading out. This project also works with schools to support conservation education.
Location: Maui, HI 

Big Seaweed Search
Monitor environmental changes along the coastlines of the United Kingdom. These observations help track the distribution of native plants and the occurrence of invasive species.
Location: United Kingdom

Beam Reach, CC-NC-SA
Orcasound
Help protect the habitat of the endangered Pacific Northwest orca. Listen in real time to underwater sounds and record when you hear orca sounds or threatening man-made sounds.
Location: Online

Susan Hicks
Grunion Greeters
This project reports on the behavior of grunions, silvery fish that come ashore to spawn. Grunion runs occur about this time each year. If you missed the run, you can use SciStarter’s Bookmark feature to be reminded of this project next season.
Location: California, USA 

Want more citizen science?  Discover more citizen science for this summer on the SciStarter Calendar.  Also, check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

Could you be a plant whisperer?

By June 27th, 2017 at 3:41 pm | Comment 1

What are plants trying to tell us?
Take a moment to look at and listen to the plants around you. Are they blooming earlier than usual? Are they playing host to pollinators? Do you know their names? Summer is finally here and the plants in our yards, parks, and schools are probably in full bloom. Below we’ve highlighted four citizen science projects that help you help plants tell their stories. Find more projects and events on SciStarter, to do now or bookmark for later.
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

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