Archive for the ‘Ocean & Water’ Category

An Autumn Bounty of Citizen Science

By October 14th, 2017 at 4:10 am | Comment

Season Spotter

Birds and monarchs are migrating and leaves are changing color. Fall is in full swing! Unfortunately, hurricanes are forming and flu season is here too.

Help scientists document nature and health changes near you to study and predict future trends.
 
Our editors selected five projects to get you started. Find more citizen science projects on SciStarter’s Project Finder.    
 
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team
Read the rest of this entry »

From Tide-pooling to Shark Diving, Citizen Science with Ocean Sanctuaries

By October 5th, 2017 at 11:57 am | Comment

Tiffany Poon dives with sharks. In fact, it’s one the biggest highlights of her diving year.

“As soon as the first one appears, usually in spring, I’ll be at La Jolla Cove spending as much time as possible with them,” Poon says. “Sometimes they’re shy and keep their distance, but often they’ll come by close enough for a nice photograph, and every now and then come in close to eyeball me with my strange camera.”

Poon is a citizen scientist for Ocean Sanctuaries, a nonprofit dedicated to researching and protecting sharks and other marine species. Read the rest of this entry »

What’s in your water?

By October 3rd, 2017 at 8:05 am | Comment

World Water Monitoring
World Water Monitoring
Our dependency on clean water is something we all have in common.
 
In celebration of the Clean Water Act’s 45th anniversary (October 18), we’ve selected six citizen science opportunities to monitor the vitality of water near you.
Find more citizen science projects on SciStarter’s Project Finder.
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

North Carolina King Tides Project

North Carolina King Tides Project
Grab your camera and document flood events throughout North Carolina. Your photos help communities understand vulnerabilities to coastal flooding and inform community planning.
 
Location: North Carolina, United States

Creek Freaks: Engaging Youth in Water Quality

IWLA
Middle school students around the globe are the experts on their local streams and creeks. Enlist your kids and monitor the quality of creeks and streams near you.
 
Location: Global

CitClops/Eye on Water

CitClops_EyeonWater
Monitoring the quality of the water in our oceans is a big job, especially when that water is constantly moving and changing. Using the Eye on Water app from the CitClops project, you can do your part by collecting information about water color, clarity and fluorescence of oceans around the world.
Location: Global

Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program

MICorps
  
Looking for a reason to get out on the lake? Michigan’s Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program is the second oldest lake monitoring program in the country.  Document changes in lake quality and share your observations with scientists.
 
Location: Michigan, US

Volunteer Stream Monitoring Program

MICorps
 
Live in Michigan? Help keep tabs on the streams in your community. MiCorps’ Volunteer Stream Monitoring Program (VSMP) provides technical assistance, training, and grants to volunteer stream monitors to ensure the collection of reliable, high-quality data.
 
Location: Michigan, US

FLOW Program

Amigos de Bolsas
Head to the beach with the Follow and Learn about the Ocean and Wetland (FLOW) program! You’ll learn about coastal ecology, participate in the collection of scientific data and get involved in environmental quality monitoring. You might also get a little sand in your shoes.
Location: Huntington Beach, CA

Discover more summertime citizen science on the SciStarter calendar. Did you know your SciStarter dashboard helps you track your contributions to projects? Complete your profile to access free tools. Want even more citizen science? Check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

Weeding: It’s Not Just for Gardeners

By August 10th, 2017 at 4:00 pm | Comment

By Kayla Keyes, Mote Marine Laboratory

Recent news about Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has been grim: the most recent aerial survey of the reef identified a stretch of bleached coral over 900 miles (1500 km) long, and scientists have declared the reef to be in a terminal stage. Studies have shown that losing the Great Barrier Reef would result in a globally destructive economic and environmental chain reaction, but despite all of the pressures threatening the future of our reefs a positive light shines brightly from Magnetic Island in Queensland, Australia. Read the rest of this entry »

Citizen Scientists Diving to Study The Mystery of Manta Rays

By July 8th, 2017 at 11:15 am | Comment

This post is part of our Divers’ series. We encourage readers to continue the conversation by adding their own comments, question or concerns on our Facebook page. You’ll find links to other posts at the end of this story. 

Two years ago I rang in the New Year by scuba diving with giant manta rays off the coast of Hawaii’s Big Island. It was a bucket list experience I will never forget and one that introduced me to a new form of citizen science.

That evening, after enjoying a late afternoon dive among sea turtles and tropical fish, my fellow divers and I returned to the boat for snacks and some instruction. Our dive leader went over the protocols for a night dive and reminded us that rays are a vulnerable species that we must not touch. Read the rest of this entry »