Archive for the ‘Space’ Category

Are We Alone? Citizen Science and the Search for Exoplanets

By July 20th, 2016 at 9:56 am | Comment

Image Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

Image Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser CC BY 4.0

Recently I attended a lecture by award-winning astronomy professor Dr. Andrew Fraknoi, who spoke about the most exciting research happening in astronomy today. He said that while black holes and gravity waves are interesting, the research he finds most intriguing is the search for planets in other solar systems, called exoplanets.

What sets exoplanet research apart, he said, is that it takes us a step closer to answering the fundamental question humans have always wondered … are we alone?

I was excited by his statement because I also recently met a couple of scientists at Mauna Kea’s Keck Observatory in Hawaii who have created a new citizen science project—called Project PANOPTES—focused on the search for exoplanets. Read the rest of this entry »

Project MERCCURI featured on NASA’s weekly update

By December 13th, 2014 at 8:54 am | Comment

What do Buzz Aldrin’s shoe, the Liberty Bell & sports arenas all have in common? Watch Space to Ground, your weekly update on what’s happening aboard the International Space Station.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFPm4G3jjwc

 

SciStarter’s Project MERCCURI, a research project to compare microbes on Earth and in space (presented by the Eisen Lab and UC Davis, SciStarter and Science Cheerleader, with support from the Sloan Foundation, Space Florida and NanoRacks), was featured on NASA’s “Space to Ground,” a weekly update on what’s happening aboard the International Space Station. Click here to read more about the status of this project!

Two days left to apply to participate online! Informing NASA’s Asteroid Initiative: A Citizen Forum

By November 4th, 2014 at 3:47 pm | Comment

What do you think NASA should do about asteroids? (Asteroid Capture, Artist Rendering Image Credit: NASA)

What do you think NASA should do about asteroids? (Asteroid Capture, Artist Rendering Image Credit: NASA)

In August, we shared information about NASA’s Asteroid Initiative and Cooperative Agreement with ECAST (Expert and Citizen Assessment of Science and Technology), to enable everyday citizens to have a say in the future of space exploration.

How does the online citizens’ forum work?

Two in-person deliberations will take place on 11/8 in Phoenix, AZ at Arizona State University and on 11/15 in Cambridge, MA at the Museum of Science. To make sure anyone, anywhere can participate, SciStarter (a founder partner of ECAST) created a three tiered online deliberation platform which will be ready for YOU next week! But you’ll need to sign up by Thursday, 11/6 to be eligible.

As a registered participant in the online deliberation, you will have access to the same background information as the folks at the in-person events will have and you’ll be able to ask questions, and weigh in with thoughts and opinions while guided by an online facilitator. AND, you will have three days to drop in and out at your convenience.

All responses will be aggregated and included in a formal report to NASA. If you can’t make the in-person or online deliberation next week, don’t worry! You’ll  still have a chance to weigh in on the outcomes of deliberations in the coming weeks!

Who can participate?

You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to participate. You also do not need to know any information about the Asteroid Initiative as all the background information required will be provided.  In fact the forum is centered around the idea that every citizen who is interested in contributing will be able to do so. So your interest in participation is all that counts!

Why should you act now to be a part of this?

The online deliberation is scheduled for next week and in order to participate, you have to register quickly as the deadline is fast approaching. Sign up on the ECAST website before November 6th and complete the required demographic and opinion survey to access the online deliberation platform. This is your chance to help NASA make the next giant leap in space. Don’t miss it!

Categories: Citizen Science,Physics,Space

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