Citizen Science in the City

We’ve got a big weekend coming up for science! Not only is Citizen Science Day on April 14th, it’s also the March for Science and we’re also preparing for the City Nature Challenge! We’ve pulled together a long list of projects you could do in a city, so there’s something for everyone!
So, plan your weekend now and find a Citizen Science Day event, join your local March for Science or participate in your closest City Nature Challenge!
Cheers,
The SciStarter Team
iNaturalist

If you’re participating in the City Nature Challenge you’ll be using iNaturalist to record your observations to count towards your city’s total! The App also uses Artificial Intelligence to help you identify what you’ve found!

Get Started!

ISeeChange

Did you know that cities are sometimes referred to as urban heat islands? They can be hotter that surrounding suburban or rural areas. How does climate and weather affect your surroundings? Recording your local environmental flooding and heat observations helps NASA track climate change.

Get Started!

Lingscape

Record the images of signs you pass every day for Lingscape. This will help document and analyze the linguistic landscape around the world to record public writing and how language in the public space changes over time.

Get Started!

NOAA

Did you know that your phone contains a highly sensitive scientific instrument? Inside is something called a magnetometer, and researchers with the project CrowdMag are using those digital magnetometers to detect changes in the earth’s magnetic field!

Get Started!

NASA GLOBE

Take a look up and make some cloud observations! Satellites can only see clouds from above, so your observations will be compared to satellite images so that clouds can be observed from both above and below!

Get Started!

Waystone Designs and Michael Reiskind

Are you starting to see (or feel) mosquitoes yet? Report whenever you encounter biting mosquitoes to help scientists at North Carolina State University track where biting mosquitoes are in real time, and you learn something along the way!

Get Started!

Victor Loewen

Have you ever wanted to learn what kind of bird you’re hearing or seeing outside your window? This project gives you a list of birds that you should be able to find in your area and you report if they are present or not! Data can be collected in urban, suburban and rural areas.

Get Started!

Waystone Designs and Michael Reiskind

Whether you’re hearing cheers or just noise from being in the city, this project will give you perspective. By measuring your local sound levels it will tell you if you live in a noisy or a quiet location compared to other participants!

Get Started!

HabitatMap

Have you ever wondered what the air quality is like in the places where you spend your day? Measure air quality and other factors using this palm-sized air quality monitor!

Get Started!

Azavea

Whether we realize it or not, even when we are in a city, we are surrounded by an urban forest. Take a look around and make note of the canopy and contribute to the OpenTreeMap!

Get Started!

Discover more citizen science on the SciStarter calendar. Did you know your SciStarter dashboard helps you track your contributions to projects? Complete your profile to access free tools. Want even more citizen science? Check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

So, plan your weekend now and find a Citizen Science Day event, join your local March for Science or participate in your closest City Nature Challenge!
Cheers,
The SciStarter Team

Categories: Birds, Citizen Science, Climate & Weather, Computers & Technology, Ecology & Environment, Events, Featured Projects, Insects, National Citizen Science Day, Nature & Outdoors, Newsletter

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About the Author

Lea Shell

Lea Shell is the Digital Learning Specialist at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. With a background in entomology and education, she has spent the past five years working in the world of citizen science, public engagement and science communication at North Carolina State University to help bring citizen science to the classroom.