Collaborative Citizen Science for Clean Water Management

By Guest March 15th, 2017 at 6:46 pm | Comment

By Lishka Arata, Conservation Educator at Point Blue

Volunteers collecting a sample from the lake to examine under the microscope. Photo: CMC

Despite the current administration’s efforts to roll back the Clean Water Act and dismantle the Environmental Protection Agency, interest and participation is growing in a new EPA- and stakeholder-led citizen science project that aims to inform clean water management.

The Cyanobacteria Monitoring Collaborative has been gathering steam since 2010, when Hilary Snook, EPA Senior Water Quality Scientist, began receiving calls from state water quality agencies with complaints from their constituents about cyanobacteria blooms occurring in their waters.

A collaborative workgroup was formed between New England state water quality scientists and the EPA in an effort to create something that was stakeholder-inclusive and educational for those concerned about and involved in addressing cyanobacteria blooms and the water quality issues that surround them. Read the rest of this entry »

MN Public Radio’s Heather McElhatton to moderate authors’ discussion at Citizen Science Association Conference

By Darlene Cavalier March 14th, 2017 at 11:24 am | Comment

There’s still time to register for the Citizen Science Association Conference (5/17-5/20 in Minneapolis, MN). Among many exciting events and discussions, and just before the opening reception on 5/17, MN Public Radio’s Heather McElhatton, will moderate a one-hour book panel discussion in the Grand Ballroom at the River Centre. The event, sponsored by Arizona State University’s Center for Engagement and Training in Science and Society, will start promptly at 5:30 pm.

Panelists include:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This will be the second Citizen Science Association conference and an estimated  1,000 participants are expected to convene from all over the world.  Join the Citizen Science Association for reduced registration fees.

This is part of a series of posts about the Citizen Science Association Conference.

 

 

It’s Raining Cats and Dogs and CoCoRaHS Wants to Know Where and How Many Fell

By Alycia Crall March 11th, 2017 at 9:31 am | Comment

You may have noticed some strange weather recently where you live. For example, in February, it reached 100o in Mangum, Oklahoma when 56o is the average. For the first time ever, temperatures in Antartica rose to the high 60s. And when was the last time you saw a headline reading Hawaii Has Had More Snow than Chicago or Denver in 2017? Some may link these strange events to a changing climate, and although climate influences weather patterns, it’s important to make a distinction between the two to fully understand the impacts of global climate change.

Neil Degrasse Tyson communicates this distinction with an analogy of a man walking his dog, and another common analogy states: “weather influences what clothes you wear on a given day, while the climate where you live influences the entire wardrobe you buy.” Read the rest of this entry »

Book Review: Diary of a Citizen Scientist

By Ashley R. Kelly March 9th, 2017 at 5:46 pm | Comment

Diary of a Citizen Scientist: Chasing Tiger Beetles and other New Ways of Engaging the World by Sharman Apt Russell. Oregon State University Press. 2014.  

From the very first pages, Russell’s diary pulls the reader into experience. Vivid descriptions, lively metaphors, and breathless narrative bring together her diary entries into a larger story of becoming a scientist. Russell and her tiger beetles are revealed within her first entry—these are indeed the main characters in the story that follows—and we find a scientist at the beginning of her expedition into the mysterious world of tiger beetles.
Read the rest of this entry »

Reef Check Underwater Science

By Kristin Butler March 3rd, 2017 at 8:00 am | Comment

“People protect what they love.” ~ Jacques Yves Cousteau

When I was a kid, my family and I used to love watching “The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau.” Every week we’d set out the TV tables and share our dinner with the French marine explorer as he led us on underwater adventures and taught us to appreciate the beauty of science and the sea.

His show is one of the main reasons I became an environmental reporter and earned my scuba diving certification in Monterey Bay, and it made a similar positive impact on millions of other kids and families across the globe.  Read the rest of this entry »