Stall Catchers citizen science game to host its first international “Catchathon”

By Guest July 10th, 2017 at 6:23 pm | Comment

If you’re familiar with “hackathons” – intense hacking marathons, or “mapathons” – mapping parties commonly held by mappers worldwide, the term “catchathon” might be starting to make some sense by now. If not – read on. There’s a marathon of Alzheimer’s citizen science coming on July 22nd, and you can be part of it! Read the rest of this entry »

Citizen Scientists Diving to Study The Mystery of Manta Rays

By Kristin Butler July 8th, 2017 at 11:15 am | Comment

This post is part of our Divers’ series. We encourage readers to continue the conversation by adding their own comments, question or concerns on our Facebook page. You’ll find links to other posts at the end of this story. 

Two years ago I rang in the New Year by scuba diving with giant manta rays off the coast of Hawaii’s Big Island. It was a bucket list experience I will never forget and one that introduced me to a new form of citizen science.

That evening, after enjoying a late afternoon dive among sea turtles and tropical fish, my fellow divers and I returned to the boat for snacks and some instruction. Our dive leader went over the protocols for a night dive and reminded us that rays are a vulnerable species that we must not touch. Read the rest of this entry »

Citizen Science with your sun, sand, and surf?

By Darlene Cavalier July 6th, 2017 at 1:47 pm | Comment

Citizen Science at the Beach
While you’re strolling along the beach this summer, consider sharing some of your keen observations with marine ecologists. Below, we’ve highlighted six beach-related citizen science projects to monitor the health of marine habitats. There is even one you can do while couch-surfing (see what we did there?). Find more projects and events on SciStarter, to do now or bookmark for later. 
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

JellyWatch
JellyWatch
Have you seen a jellyfish at your favorite beach yet? Jellywatch is a global public database documenting jellyfish but also red tides, squid and mammal strandings, and other indicators of ocean health. It’s simple to share your beach observations with this open database.
Location: Any coastal beach

E. Demers
British Columbia Beached Bird Survey
Surveying bird mortality is a helpful measure of marine ecology health. If you spot a dead bird along the beach, send in your observation to these researchers.
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Maui Coastal Marine Debris Monitoring
Maui Coastal Marine Debris Monitoring  
Help quantify and remove debris from Maui’s coastline. Contact project organizer Pacific Whale Foundation to get supplies before heading out. This project also works with schools to support conservation education.
Location: Maui, HI 

Big Seaweed Search
Monitor environmental changes along the coastlines of the United Kingdom. These observations help track the distribution of native plants and the occurrence of invasive species.
Location: United Kingdom

Beam Reach, CC-NC-SA
Orcasound
Help protect the habitat of the endangered Pacific Northwest orca. Listen in real time to underwater sounds and record when you hear orca sounds or threatening man-made sounds.
Location: Online

Susan Hicks
Grunion Greeters
This project reports on the behavior of grunions, silvery fish that come ashore to spawn. Grunion runs occur about this time each year. If you missed the run, you can use SciStarter’s Bookmark feature to be reminded of this project next season.
Location: California, USA 

Want more citizen science?  Discover more citizen science for this summer on the SciStarter Calendar.  Also, check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

Could you be a plant whisperer?

By Catherine Hoffman June 27th, 2017 at 3:41 pm | Comment 1

What are plants trying to tell us?
Take a moment to look at and listen to the plants around you. Are they blooming earlier than usual? Are they playing host to pollinators? Do you know their names? Summer is finally here and the plants in our yards, parks, and schools are probably in full bloom. Below we’ve highlighted four citizen science projects that help you help plants tell their stories. Find more projects and events on SciStarter, to do now or bookmark for later.
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

Read the rest of this entry »

Capturing the Total Solar Eclipse, One Photo at a Time

By Guest June 21st, 2017 at 9:00 am | Comment

By: Alexei V. Filippenko and Hugh Hudson

Diagram of a solar eclipse. Credit: Google

On August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will trace a shadow over a narrow band of the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.  And if you own a digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera*, you can become a part of scientific history by joining hundreds of other photographers to make the first crowdsourced image archive of a total solar eclipse from coast to coast.

The “Eclipse Megamovie” project aims to capture many types of solar phenomena with images taken along the path of totality of the August 21 eclipse by over 1,000 trained volunteers, as well as photos from many more members of the general public through the use of smartphones and simple cameras. This first-of-its-kind citizen science project is a partnership between Google, UC Berkeley, and many others. Our primary goal is to collect as much imagery as possible and to hold it in a vast public-domain archive for future study.  Read the rest of this entry »