Celebrating Shark Week with Sevengill Sharks

By Alycia Crall July 28th, 2017 at 2:41 pm | Comment

This week is Shark Week so we wanted to celebrate by returning to three posts written about Sevengill Sharks and ways you can support their conservation through the Sevengill Sharks Tracking Project.  The first post (seen below) was published in 2013 with others following in 2015 and 2016.  Not really into carnivorous fish? Check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone! Read the rest of this entry »

A new, national “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Girl Scouts journey!

By Darlene Cavalier July 25th, 2017 at 9:38 pm | Comment

girl scouts citizen science scistarter badge
A new Think Like a Citizen Scientist Girl Scouts journey was released this morning in collaboration with SciStarter as part of the Girl Scouts of USA’s announcement that it is adding 23 new badges related to science, technology, engineering, math and the outdoors. Girl Scouts can now earn badges through activities like programming robots, citizen science, designing model race cars, writing code and going on environmentally conscious camping trips. The Girl Scouts of the USA, founded in 1912, created these badges in collaboration with organizations like Code.org, SciStarter, GoldieBlox and the Society of Women Engineers.
Here’s more information on the Think Like a Citizen Scientist Journey
Here’s more information on the Girl Scouts’ STEM initiatives
“Girl Scouts is thrilled to collaborate with SciStarter on new citizen science programming, which will allow girls around the country to substantively contribute to and impact research that professional scientists are conducting,” said GSUSA CEO Sylvia Acevedo. “Connecting Girl Scouts with SciStarter’s enriching platform further enhances our engaging and comprehensive STEM programming. Girls who participate in the ‘Think Like a Citizen Scientist’ series will be fully immersed in the scientific process—some for the first time―as well as gain a broadened understanding that science is for everyone.”
“Girl Scout programs inspire and support girls to take action on an issue, and make their efforts sustainable,” said Darlene Cavalier, Founder of SciStarter and Professor of Practice at Arizona State University. “We are excited to help mobilize Girl Scouts across the country to advance scientific research while applying new SciStarter 2.0 analytics tools so the Girl Scouts of the USA can understand what types of citizen science projects appeal to girls, and use that information to continue to offer even more relevant and impactful STEM programming for girls.”
Girls will earn their badges by completing one of seven citizen science projects with the option of continuing their Journey with their choice of 30 additional, vetted projects featured on SciStarter. The selected projects exemplify ways citizen science can engage people of all ages to advance scientific research. The projects use clear protocols, and simple tools and instruments, making them accessible for Girl Scout troops and leaders across the country. The seven projects get girls engaged in science in the outdoors in a new, unique way.  Finally, the projects integrate SciStarter affiliate tools, making it possible for the Girl Scouts to use SciStarter’s analytics to understand what types of projects attract, engage, and sustain involvement among girls. The seven projects are:
Stream Selfie, Ant Picnic, Project Squirrel, iSeeChange, NASA GLOBE Observer, Nature’s Notebook, Globe at Night.
The “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Journey—a form of Girl Scout programming that includes several troop meetings dedicated to the topic—begins in a Girl Scout troop and online with SciStarter. A troop learns how to make and share careful observations to contribute to research efforts. Next, the troop decides how to take action: they discuss the scientific research they’ve done and identify a related problem, come up with a creative and sustainable solution, put a team plan into action, and document their project on SciStarter. The girls have now earned an award for completing the “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” Journey!
If you manage a project you’d like us to consider for the “additional projects” or future Journeys, please add it to the SciStarter project finder and email GirlScouts@SciStarter.com to indicate your interest.
Our goal at SciStarter is to help as many people as possible discover and participate in awesome projects!
Now…please go encourage your favorite Girl Scout to begin her journey to Think Like A Citizen Scientist!

Categories: girl scouts

Tags: ,

Shark Week: A feeding frenzy for citizen scientists!

By Darlene Cavalier July 21st, 2017 at 12:22 pm | Comment

Sink your teeth into these projects!

Photo: Shark Count

The Discovery Channel kicks off Shark Week in three days, when we’ll will find out if Michael Phelps is faster than a shark! Not quite up for racing a shark yourself? You can still celebrate Shark Week by getting involved in one of the many citizen science projects that study and protect sharks. Below, we’ve highlighted five projects we think you’ll love. In some cases, you can even participate from the comfort of home. Find more projects and events on SciStarter, to do now or bookmark for later. Remember to update your profile before August 15th to unlock access to a special prize!

Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

eShark
eShark
Calling all divers and snorkelers! You have valuable information to share because you can census areas that fishers can’t. Help track how shark and ray populations have changed.
Location: Global

SharkBase
SharkBase
Even if you’ve never seen a shark in the wild, you can still contribute to SharkBase by submitting sightings that you see in the news or on the internet. Your observations will help track sharks’ global population changes.
Location: Global. Online.

New England Basking Shark and Ocean Sunfish Project
Help monitor basking shark and ocean sunfish in New England waters by sending in your photos from the seas!
Location: New England, USA

Credit_ Kelli Shaw
Sevengill Shark Identification 
Scuba divers are needed to help monitor sevengill sharks as they return each year to San Diego, CA and South Africa. Share your photos which will be analyzed online, using a pattern recognition system.
Location: San Diego, CA; South Africa 

ELMO South African Elasmobranch Monitoring
Collect data on South African sharks, skates, rays and chimaera sightings as well as their eggcases along the South African coastline. Whether you are a snorkeler, diver, swimmer, skipper, angler or a beachwalker, you can assist by reporting your sighting or reports you’ve seen in the news.
Location: Mozambique Republic, South Africa

Discover more summertime citizen on the SciStarter Calendar. Needed: 1,000 skilled photographers to help create the Eclipse MegaMovie on August 21Want more citizen science? Check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

Finding the Common Culture: Uniting Science and the Humanities in Citizen Science

By Guest July 18th, 2017 at 5:43 pm | Comment

By Brad Mehlenbacher (North Carolina State University) and Ashley Rose Mehlenbacher (University of Waterloo)

Through citizen science projects, the Bodleian Library is improving access to their music collections, the Smithsonian is transcribing important documents, and researchers at the University of Oxford are transcribing Ancient Greek text from Greco-Roman Egypt. Although these projects represent promising examples of the humanities and social sciences, citizen science projects in these fields still aren’t all that common.

Humanities and social sciences (HSS) include disciplines such as language studies, classics, comparative literature, history, philosophy, anthropology, psychology, economics, education, political science, and so on. These disciplines vary considerably in their intellectual traditions, methods, and disciplinary norms, but there are also common issues, questions, and challenges each discipline shares with the others. In fact, HSS and STEM disciplines also share common issues, questions, and challenges. Read the rest of this entry »

Network of Bees

By Russ Campbell July 14th, 2017 at 11:55 am | Comment

There is a lot to learn from bees. The survival of the hive depends on the combined efforts of the entire colony. In Conetoe (pronounced KUH-nee-tah), North Carolina Reverend Richard Joyner and his family of youth beekeepers are tending to bees and building community, one hive at a time.

Reverend Joyner is the force behind the Conetoe Family Life Center, created to address the fact that in one year, he conducted more than 30 funerals for people under 50 who had died from chronic disease. 30 funerals. For a community of 300. Read the rest of this entry »