Archive for the ‘bats’ tag

Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story

By January 25th, 2017 at 4:17 pm | Comment

Join Jojo and her family counting bats as citizen scientists in the soon-to-be-released book Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story!

Soon-to-be-released: Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story

It won’t be in stores until the end of February, but you can read — and listen to — a free digital review copy today.  The story, written  by Philadelphia-area author Anna Forrester and illustrated by Susan Detwiler, encourages kids to get involved in citizen science and make it their own.

Forrester worked with Katie Gillies, Director of the Imperiled Species Program at Bat Conservation International, and Catherine J. Hibbard, White-nose Syndrome Communications Leader with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, to verify the accuracy of the information in the book.

Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story will be available in bookstores in February 2017 in  hardcover and paperback in English, and in paperback i nSpanish. Preorders are being accepted now and will ship as soon as the books arrive.

For information about ordering the book, including wholesale and non-profit rates, contact Donna German, general manager of Arbordale Publishing, at donna@arbordalepublishing.com

 

Celebrate Halloween with SciStarter

By October 27th, 2016 at 1:25 pm | Comment

pumpkinAre you looking for something to make you shudder this Halloween? You can skip the scary movies and the frightening costumes. We’ve got projects that are creepy, slimy, scary, and above all else fun!  Below, we’ve highlighted five spooky projects to help you celebrate Halloween.
Find more with the Scistarter Project Finder.
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

Read the rest of this entry »

Boat Trips for Bat Monitoring: How Wisconsin Residents are Helping Bat Conservation

By June 4th, 2016 at 10:36 pm | Comment

Bat Monitoring on Boats (Image Credit: WDNR, Wisconsin Bat Program)

Bat Monitoring on Boats (Image Credit: WDNR, Wisconsin Bat Program)

These volunteers are part of the Wisconsin Bat Program, a citizen science project run by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. There are three different ways that Wisconsin residents can contribute to our understanding of bat populations across the state. The most involved, and for many the most fun, is to conduct night time acoustic monitoring using special handheld bat detectors. Read the rest of this entry »

Citizen Science for Bat Fans!

By May 26th, 2016 at 7:36 pm | Comment

Photo: USFWS
Those Elusive Flying Mammals!

Bats can be tricky to spot and observe but let’s try because they need our help.  As disease, habitat loss, and climate change decimate some bat populations, we can help scientists monitor and protect them.

Below, our editors highlight five bat-related citizen projects from around the globe.

Find more than 1,600 projects and events in the SciStarter Global Project Finder.
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

Read the rest of this entry »

Halloween Citizen Science in the Classroom: Answer the Bat Call!

By October 31st, 2014 at 12:04 pm | Comment 1

Editor’s Note: This post is part of our Citizen Science in the Classroom Series where we explore the use of citizen science projects to teach science in the classroom by aligning them with Common Core and Next Generation STEM standards . For more such projects check out the resources page for educators on SciStarter!

 

Mexican Free Tailed Bats in Texas exit their ‘bat cave’ to hunt for flying insects

Mexican Free Tailed Bats in Texas exit their ‘bat cave’ to hunt for flying insects (Photo Credit: US Fish and Wildlife Service CC BY 2.0)

Did you know? This week is Bat Week! There are many exciting online resources and activities for Bat Week. Visit Bat Week’s virtual host, BatsLive Project Edubat for additional Bat Week information and resources on how you can help bats!

Bat Detective

Grades: 4th-12th

Description:

Have you ever wondered about the secret lives of bats? Their adaptations, what and when they eat, where they sleep, how they communicate, their migration and hibernation patterns, and more? As a mostly nocturnal mammal species, we don’t often see them. Read the rest of this entry »