Archive for the ‘Citizen Science’ tag

Help scientists discover what else happens during a solar eclipse!

By August 4th, 2017 at 6:48 pm | Comment 1

It’s a Solar Eclipse!

I, Luc Viatour

When the moon completely covers the sun on August 21, will animals behave differently? Will air and surface temperatures fluctuate? Help scientists answer these and other research questions!

Below, we highlight projects you can do in the path of the eclipse, in your own backyard, and a couple for after the eclipse. Find more projects and events on SciStarter, to do now or bookmark for later.

Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

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Citizen Science Day: Goggles, Lab Coat, Degree not Required

By May 13th, 2017 at 5:26 pm | Comment

Darlene Cavalier, Founder of SciStarter

Darlene Cavalier was recently featured on the “Lab Out Loud” podcast discussing ways to get involved in science in and out of the classroom.

Listen now to learn how you, your students and your family can be citizen scientists by catching clouds with an app, documenting road kill, or fighting Alzheimer’s with an online game. These are all ways you can participate and celebrate Citizen Science Day!

Thank you to Lab Out Loud podcast for featuring SciStarter and for National Science Teacher’s Association for providing support for the podcast.

Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story

By January 25th, 2017 at 4:17 pm | Comment

Join Jojo and her family counting bats as citizen scientists in the soon-to-be-released book Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story!

Soon-to-be-released: Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story

It won’t be in stores until the end of February, but you can read — and listen to — a free digital review copy today.  The story, written  by Philadelphia-area author Anna Forrester and illustrated by Susan Detwiler, encourages kids to get involved in citizen science and make it their own.

Forrester worked with Katie Gillies, Director of the Imperiled Species Program at Bat Conservation International, and Catherine J. Hibbard, White-nose Syndrome Communications Leader with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, to verify the accuracy of the information in the book.

Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story will be available in bookstores in February 2017 in  hardcover and paperback in English, and in paperback i nSpanish. Preorders are being accepted now and will ship as soon as the books arrive.

For information about ordering the book, including wholesale and non-profit rates, contact Donna German, general manager of Arbordale Publishing, at donna@arbordalepublishing.com

 

SciStarter’s Top Projects of 2016: From Microbes to Meteors

By January 5th, 2017 at 11:19 pm | Comment

calendar
Top 10 Projects of 2016
Happy New Year!
Looking for opportunities to make the world a better place this year? Start with these popular projects, which had the most traffic on SciStarter in 2016.
Find more on SciStarter then simply bookmark your favorites to receive seasonal reminders!
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

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Quality and quantity with citizen science

By December 21st, 2016 at 4:57 pm | Comment

Citizen science is a range of activities and projects through which people from all walks of life help advance scientific discovery. Citizen scientists bring science into the mainstream and make science relevant to their lives. As a scientist, I rely on citizen scientists as research collaborators. As a blogger, I’ve become a citizen science advocate giving three cheers to discoveries and projects. Every time I share stories about citizen science, the most frequent response I receive is skepticism about data quality. How could people – veritable strangers – without formal training in the sciences be of any authentic use to professional scientific research projects? How can people without scientific credential do work of sufficient quality to result in products of genuine scientific value? Is it really possible for science-society collaborations involving individuals with highly variable levels of expertise to produce reliable and trustworthy knowledge? Read the rest of this entry »