Archive for the ‘Citizen Science’ tag

Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story

By January 25th, 2017 at 4:17 pm | Comment

Join Jojo and her family counting bats as citizen scientists in the soon-to-be-released book Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story!

Soon-to-be-released: Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story

It won’t be in stores until the end of February, but you can read — and listen to — a free digital review copy today.  The story, written  by Philadelphia-area author Anna Forrester and illustrated by Susan Detwiler, encourages kids to get involved in citizen science and make it their own.

Forrester worked with Katie Gillies, Director of the Imperiled Species Program at Bat Conservation International, and Catherine J. Hibbard, White-nose Syndrome Communications Leader with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, to verify the accuracy of the information in the book.

Bat Count: A Citizen Science Story will be available in bookstores in February 2017 in  hardcover and paperback in English, and in paperback i nSpanish. Preorders are being accepted now and will ship as soon as the books arrive.

For information about ordering the book, including wholesale and non-profit rates, contact Donna German, general manager of Arbordale Publishing, at donna@arbordalepublishing.com

 

SciStarter’s Top Projects of 2016: From Microbes to Meteors

By January 5th, 2017 at 11:19 pm | Comment

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Top 10 Projects of 2016
Happy New Year!
Looking for opportunities to make the world a better place this year? Start with these popular projects, which had the most traffic on SciStarter in 2016.
Find more on SciStarter then simply bookmark your favorites to receive seasonal reminders!
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

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Quality and quantity with citizen science

By December 21st, 2016 at 4:57 pm | Comment

Citizen science is a range of activities and projects through which people from all walks of life help advance scientific discovery. Citizen scientists bring science into the mainstream and make science relevant to their lives. As a scientist, I rely on citizen scientists as research collaborators. As a blogger, I’ve become a citizen science advocate giving three cheers to discoveries and projects. Every time I share stories about citizen science, the most frequent response I receive is skepticism about data quality. How could people – veritable strangers – without formal training in the sciences be of any authentic use to professional scientific research projects? How can people without scientific credential do work of sufficient quality to result in products of genuine scientific value? Is it really possible for science-society collaborations involving individuals with highly variable levels of expertise to produce reliable and trustworthy knowledge? Read the rest of this entry »

SciStarter and the Science Cheerleaders join forces at the Bay Area Science Festival

By November 8th, 2016 at 12:21 pm | Comment

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Bay Area Science Festival at ATT Park.

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Science Cheerleaders explore the festival.

Imagine thousands of scientists, naturalists, engineers, and innovators in one place and that’s the Bay Area Science Festival! The SciStarter team travelled to San Francisco to spread the joy of citizen science to this excited group. We were lucky to be joined by Kayla and Anelisse from the 49ers Gold Rush squad and the two newest Science Cheerleaders.

Kayla and Anelisse explored the festival stopping for photos with future scientists. Kayla is pursuing her doctorate to become a clinical psychologist and hopes to work with people with mental health needs. Anelisse is a recent engineering graduate and is now learning to code for a software start-up. Both of these women challenge the stereotypes of cheerleaders and women in science, paving the way for future women in STEM. Read more about their experience on the Science Cheerleader blog and learn about the new Science of Cheerleading e-book.

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A view down the SciStarter booth

The SciStarter booth featured Chris Quock from the ZomBee Watch project. He brought along samples of honeybees and zombie flies to educate attendees on the spread of this unusual parasite. He also showed off a DIY light trap to attract and capture potential ZomBees.

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Learning about migration and changing seasons

Kids at our booth could also make their own coloring sheet featuring a migrating animal from the Journey North project. These sheets are colorful reminders to keep an eye out for animals as the move south for the winter and when they return north in the summer.

 

 

We were also joined by staff and volunteers from the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory who demonstrated how professional and citizen scientists can track birds through banding. Kids were able to practice bird banding, by banding themselves!

Thank you to everyone who stopped by the booth to unleash their inner scientist!

Learn more about our featured projects.

Journey North

ZomBee Watch

CalAcademy Citizen Science

Project Panoptes

Folding@Home

San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory 

Saving California’s Seals and Sea Lions

By October 11th, 2016 at 10:58 pm | Comment

We tend to think of famine in human terms. But animal populations also experience wide-spread hunger, and the hundreds of emaciated young seals and sea lions stranded on California beaches in the past year were a poignant example.

Fortunately, a large team of citizen scientists at The Marine Mammal Center—an animal hospital and research institute north of San Francisco—were ready for the challenge. Twenty-eight crews of 15-20 people worked day and night shifts to rescue and rehabilitate the starving pups and yearlings. By July, 2016, about 1200 volunteers and 50 staff members had fought to save 380 sea lions, 220 elephant seals, 120 harbor seals, and 20 Guadalupe fur seals.  Read the rest of this entry »