Archive for the ‘coral reefs’ tag

From snorkeling to selfies, here’s how you can advance scientific research

By May 25th, 2017 at 7:08 pm | Comment

You’re in good company
unnamed (2)We just returned from the 2017 Citizen Science Association conference in St. Paul, MN and we can confirm that citizen science is hot!  Give yourself a pat on the back for being part of this awesome movement!
Below, we share some new and alumni projects we think you’ll love. Find more projects and events on SciStarter, to do now or bookmark for later.
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

NASA
Globe at Night
Seven out of 10 people in the US have never seen the Milky Way Galaxy in the night sky due to light pollution. You can help understand light pollution in your community by measuring the night sky brightness.
Location: Global 

Stream Selfie
Map streams across the country and start testing the waters with Stream Selfie. All you need to do is find a stream, snap a photo, and answer some brief questions. You’ll help fill important gaps in our understanding of water quality.
Location: United States

Rescue a Reef
You can help with coral reef restoration with the University of Miami research team. You will be trained in data collection, coral nursery management, and coral restoration. You will need either SCUBA Certification or strong snorkeling skills.
Location: Miami, Florida

Avi
FloodCrowd
Across the United Kingdom, if you’ve seen a flood, big or small, you can contribute your observation to FloodCrowd. Your observations will help assess flood risk management with citizen science.
Location: United Kingdom

North Carolina King Tides
Be on the lookout for high water in North Carolina due to heavy rains, storms, wind, and king tides. Your photos help communities understand their vulnerabilities to coastal flooding during times of extreme high tides or sea-level rise.
Location: North Carolina

Congratulations to the Project Slam finalists! 

We heard over 20 fast-paced talks about new citizen science projects during the Project Slam sponsored by SciStarter at the Citizen Science Association conference. Congratulations to Sparrow Swap, Mark2Cure, and the City Nature Challenge for being the top-voted projects!


Want more citizen science? Check out SciStarter’s Project Finder! With 1100+ citizen science projects spanning every field of research, task and age group, there’s something for everyone!

Reef Check Underwater Science

By March 3rd, 2017 at 8:00 am | Comment

“People protect what they love.” ~ Jacques Yves Cousteau

When I was a kid, my family and I used to love watching “The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau.” Every week we’d set out the TV tables and share our dinner with the French marine explorer as he led us on underwater adventures and taught us to appreciate the beauty of science and the sea.

His show is one of the main reasons I became an environmental reporter and earned my scuba diving certification in Monterey Bay, and it made a similar positive impact on millions of other kids and families across the globe.  Read the rest of this entry »

Divers Help Quell the Roar of Invasive Lionfish

By August 7th, 2011 at 10:23 pm | Comment

A lionfish near the Caribbean island of Bonaire (Photo by Anne Pharamond)

A lionfish near the Caribbean island of Bonaire (Photo by Anne Pharamond)

It seems strange to mark the location of a fish, doesn’t it? They can swim and move away from the marker, right? I wonder while standing on a dock waiting for the boat that will take about ten of us out to a reef. There, we will scuba dive for fun and also mark the locations of lionfish, an invasive species in the Caribbean.

Volunteer divers on the Dutch island of Bonaire are helping Bonaire National Marine Park eliminate invasive lionfish from its coral reefs by marking the locations where the fish are found. A diver who spots a lionfish is instructed to attach a small flag, provided by the park, to a rock near the fish.

The answers to my questions about marking fish locations become clear once I splash into the water and see the fish and flag markers for myself.  Swimming along sections of reef, I saw dozens of flags that had been placed there by divers and each had one or more lionfish hovering nearby. It turns out that lionfish don’t stray far from their particular nook of reef. They stay near the markers.

It’s illegal to hunt or in any way harm marine life in the waters surrounding Bonaire. Except, that is, for lionfish.

Read the rest of this entry »