Archive for the ‘STEM’ tag

Girl Scouts Think Like Citizen Scientists

By October 20th, 2017 at 2:37 pm | Comment

By Sharon Karasick

Girl Scouts are encouraged to try all sorts of new things in their scouting experience, a commitment reflected in their new motto: ”When she’s a Girl Scout, she’s also a G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™.  While many troops still embrace the traditional three c’s of crafts, camping, and cookies, Girl Scouts are also exploring new civic engagement opportunities through innovative STEM programming.

On the surface, civic engagement might not seem to have much in common with STEM, an acronym that stands for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. But the Girl Scouts’ new partnership with SciStarter offers girls a unique opportunity to participate in authentic scientific research, to share that research with others, and to encourage the people in their communities to take action to help take better care of the world we live in.   Read the rest of this entry »

Think Like A Citizen Scientist with Girl Scouts of the USA

By October 10th, 2017 at 10:50 am | Comment

Philadelphia, Penn. – (October 10, 2017) –SciStarter and Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) are teaming up to encourage girls to pursue citizen science activities and exploration with new programming in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math). Girl Scouts of the USA has launched a new “Think Like a Citizen Scientist” series developed specifically to draw girls into the excitement of authentic scientific discovery through a new, customized Girl Scouts portal on SciStarter.

Read the rest of this entry »

Finding the Common Culture: Uniting Science and the Humanities in Citizen Science

By July 18th, 2017 at 5:43 pm | Comment

By Brad Mehlenbacher (North Carolina State University) and Ashley Rose Mehlenbacher (University of Waterloo)

Through citizen science projects, the Bodleian Library is improving access to their music collections, the Smithsonian is transcribing important documents, and researchers at the University of Oxford are transcribing Ancient Greek text from Greco-Roman Egypt. Although these projects represent promising examples of the humanities and social sciences, citizen science projects in these fields still aren’t all that common.

Humanities and social sciences (HSS) include disciplines such as language studies, classics, comparative literature, history, philosophy, anthropology, psychology, economics, education, political science, and so on. These disciplines vary considerably in their intellectual traditions, methods, and disciplinary norms, but there are also common issues, questions, and challenges each discipline shares with the others. In fact, HSS and STEM disciplines also share common issues, questions, and challenges. Read the rest of this entry »

Back to School with Citizen Science!

By September 8th, 2016 at 1:36 pm | Comment

As students head back to school, more and more teachers are using citizen science in their classrooms to give students authentic science experiences.
Below, our editors highlight some of the many excellent citizen science projects that work well in classrooms. You can find even more with the SciStarter Global Project Finder.
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

Read the rest of this entry »

Categories: Citizen Science

Tags: ,

Know your numbers

By January 14th, 2013 at 7:44 am | Comment

Do you know your numbers?

Do you just “get” numbers? Or have they always left you a little baffled? Now you can test this observation and quantify your number sense.

Number sense is our “gut knowledge” of numbers’ magnitude, their relationships, and even basic arithmetic. Number sense is thought to be innate, potently present as early as infancy. But while we all have it, we are not made equal. Individuals vary in the accuracy of their number sense. In other words, some people are better at guessing than others. Scientists think that such differences could relate to an individual’s mathematical aptitude.

To explore this further, researchers at John Hopkins University developed a number discrimination test, available for free online. The 10 minute test is straightforward. Yellow and blue dots flash onto a screen and you have to guess if there were more yellow or blue dots. After, the program provides a report of your performance and a comparison to others in your demographic.

Already researchers around the world have used this tool to explore different aspects of and factors relating to number sense. The John Hopkins developers have also created a package for educators that includes instructions for administering the test and guides for data analysis.

Curious to learn more? Test yourself!

Photo: USAF

Categories: Tools

Tags: , , , , ,